The Yalta Conference was a meeting held in February 1945 between the three main Allied powers of the Second World War: the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union. The conference was held in the Ukrainian city of Yalta, and it was at this meeting that the decision was made to divide Germany into four occupied zones, with each of the Allied powers governing one of the zones.

However, this was not the only country that was split into two zones by the Yalta Agreement. The country in question was Korea, which was not directly involved in the Yalta Conference but was divided into two zones of occupation by the United States and the Soviet Union in August 1945.

The division of Korea was initially intended to be a temporary measure, with the aim of creating a unified and independent Korea. However, this never materialized, and the two zones became increasingly separate and distinct over time. The United States supported a democratic government in the southern zone, while the Soviet Union supported a communist government in the northern zone.

This division led to the Korean War, which began in 1950 and lasted for three years. The war eventually ended in a stalemate, with a ceasefire agreement being signed in 1953. The country remained divided into two zones, with the northern zone becoming the Democratic People`s Republic of Korea (North Korea) and the southern zone becoming the Republic of Korea (South Korea).

Today, the division of Korea remains a major geopolitical issue, with tensions between North Korea and South Korea still high. The Korean Demilitarized Zone, which was established in 1953 as a buffer zone between the two countries, remains one of the most heavily fortified borders in the world.

In conclusion, while Germany is often considered the main country that was split into two zones by the Yalta Agreement, Korea was also divided into two zones of occupation by the United States and the Soviet Union. This division ultimately led to the Korean War and the ongoing tensions between North Korea and South Korea today.